New kitchen cabinets are invariably expensive and contrary to the entire notion of a budget kitchen remodel. In general, all tear-out-and-replace projects are much more expensive than projects that keep a majority of the materials, and cabinetry is a prime example.  It is also more eco-friendly to avoid landfilling tons of flooring, glass, laminates, plastics, and other materials that take centuries to degrade. There are several good options that won't require new kitchen cabinetry:
You’re right that there should definitely be some kind of ventilation in a bathroom to prevent moisture build-up. My husband and I are remodeling our bathroom and removing the window that is attached to one wall (it’s just so awkward having one there) and installing a vent to replace it is definitely something we’ll want to look into. I’m not sure if we already have an inlet valve, but our toilet can be rather noisy, so we’ll have to talk to the contractor about that, as well.
That's because, unless you're uncommonly motivated, you're not going to have freshly shaken paint for the duration of your project. And you can't bring settled paint back to life with a stir stick alone. No, you need to pour the paint back and forth between two buckets until you've scraped and mixed the solids at the bottom. That's the best, and really only, way to ensure your paint is mixed. And if you have paint in several different cans, you want to mix those, too, to make sure everything is uniform. (See "boxing.")
Instead of using white primer, pros usually have it tinted gray or a color that's similar to the finish paint. Tinted primer does a better job of covering the existing paint color than plain primer, so your finish coat will be more vibrant and may require fewer coats. This is especially true with colors like red or orange, which could require three or more coats without a primer. 
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