Don't cheap out on paint and brushes. Cheap brushes are false economy. Buy a Wooster or something with some heft. That $3 plastic brush is going make it look like you smeared paint on the wall with a rake. And the bristles fall out. I like a nice 2-1/2-inch angled brush. It's versatile and you can wash and reuse it until the bristles wear down to a nub. And get the most expensive paint, too. Why? Because it will go on easy and offer the best coverage. It'll last a long time. You'll be able to wash a grubby fingerprint off the wall without taking the paint with it. And your whole job will just go quicker and easier.
While installing one does require reframing the wall to create a slim space into which the door can slide, this change doesn’t take away more than a few inches of space from the adjoining room. If you’re remodeling a master bathroom, you also have the option of installing a pocket door with a frosted privacy glass panel, which will visually open up the area even more.
Acrylic urethane has many properties that make it a perfect primer for cabinets. First, it sticks tenaciously to almost any surface. You could even paint over plastic laminate cabinets with acrylic urethane. Acrylic urethane also cures to a very hard and durable finish. You can use acrylic urethane primer and cover it with your choice of paint. Or you can use acrylic urethane paint as the final coat too. Insl-X Cabinet Coat (not shown) is one brand of acrylic urethane paint formulated for cabinets.

I will say that we had a lot of trouble with Ikea. They messed our order up and I ended up having to go back two additional times, which was a hassle (we live on an island, Ikea is a $150 ferry ride away). In the end, I’d do it the same way next time. The price difference was just too much to ignore. Though I’ll be more careful to check over what they’re giving me next time!
"One recommendation I would offer is to take out the clunky sink cabinet and replace it with a floating countertop with a vessel sink. You can then incorporate either hanging or floating shelves below for storage (include baskets for those items you don't necessarily wish to display). This takes the visual weight up and off the floor while still providing for ample storage in a small space - something much needed in every bathroom." - Huh? Designs
Until a few decades ago, all bathrooms were small—most were no larger than 5 feet by 8 feet, providing just enough room for a tub/shower combination, vanity, and toilet. You might think that the smaller the bathroom, the more challenging the remodeling, because how can you create openness and space without tearing out any existing walls? Luckily, homeowners who plan to work with what they’ve got may find that smart choices in colors, fixtures, and amenities can make a small bathroom look and feel larger than its actual square footage. We asked Joe Maykut, a product manager for Sears Home Services, to share with us the design tactics that work best for homeowners stuck with small bathrooms—and boy, did he deliver. If you’re itching to remodel your bathroom, the following eight tips will help you make the most of your small space.
You should sand cabinets before beginning your how to paint kitchen cabinet project to give the new paint a good surface to grip. But you don’t need to sand to bare wood. If your cabinets have a factory finish, sand lightly with 120-grit sandpaper or a sanding sponge. If the surface is rough from a previous paint job or poor varnishing job, start with coarser 100-grit paper to remove bumps. Then sand again with 120-grit to get rid of any sanding marks.

“We wanted new granite (or similar) countertops, but with a new roof, a baby on the way, a home refi (and a few other larger expenses) we just couldn’t swing it. So I once again turned to Pinterest, where I stumbled upon this blog post with steps detailing how to pretty easily convert your existing countertops to polished concrete coated ones. We decided that this was the only way for us to go (at least for now until we are possibly ready to professionally update them in the future).”
In the final measure, it is only the homeowner who has a true stake in keeping costs down for a kitchen remodeling project. All of the secondary parties involved in a kitchen remodel, including contractors, subcontractors, architects, designers, and suppliers, will tacitly agree to your stated budget. But it is not within their best interests to do so, since they are trying to maximize their profits at the same time you are trying to maximize your cost savings.  
You may not have a wad of cash or a lot of home-improvement know-how, but you have other resources that can help get your decorating project off the ground: the people you know. Call on a group of relatives, friends and neighbors who can supply the muscle to rip down wall paneling, roll on paint or assemble a room of flat-packed furniture. Just don’t forget to feed them lunch.

Choosing the right layout for your powder room is important, not just for you but for your guests. This is the bathroom that your friends and neighbors will use most often in your home, rather than traveling to the private bathroom next to your bedroom.Powder rooms got their name from the 18th century, and are still largely used for the same purpose: as a space for guests to freshen up. Nowadays, powder rooms typically include a toilet and a sink, but never a tub or a shower. If you are looking to build a custom powder room from scratch, you should make space near your entryway or off of one of the more public rooms in your home.Typical powder rooms are about 20 square feet in size, and can be an easy extension to a living room or hallway. Pedestal sinks are a great way to save space when your powder room is on the smaller side, leaving plenty of legroom for guests. There are certain measurements and specifications that must be utilized in accordance with the IRC. The toilet and sink must always be accessible. But in most cases, this is easy to accomplish for your bathroom remodeling.
When you're ready to call it a day, you can soak your roller in paint and then wrap it in a plastic bag so it's airtight. If you're returning to the job the next day, that'll work fine. If it's going to be a while, you can still put the bag over the roller, but then use it to pull the roller off without covering yourself in paint. Then use a new roller the next time (see: Don't be cheap). As for your expensive brush, you can wash that out—presuming you're using latex paint, which is water-based. Drag a hose to an out-of-the way spot and wash the brush while alternately rapping it against the bottom of your shoe to shake out the bristles. Do that until it's clean and it'll be ready to go the next time you steel your courage to tackle another room.
Unless you've got loads of time (and expertise) to spend on your project, the best way to add sweat equity is up front, by handling your own demolition, or at the back end, by doing some of the finish work yourself. "If you want to save money, dig in and start helping out," says Tom Silva. "You can insulate, you can paint, you can sand." Or better still, he says, help with cleanup every day. "Instead of paying someone to pick up sawdust off the floor, put your money into the time it takes to trim the window properly," he advises.
If you jump into a remodeling project with an ambiguous contract or no contract at all, you may as well hire an attorney and set a court date right away. "The contract needs the right address, a start date, a completion date, and a detail of what is and is not going to be done," says Rosie Romero, founder of Legacy Custom Builders in Scottsdale, Arizona.
In the final measure, it is only the homeowner who has a true stake in keeping costs down for a kitchen remodeling project. All of the secondary parties involved in a kitchen remodel, including contractors, subcontractors, architects, designers, and suppliers, will tacitly agree to your stated budget. But it is not within their best interests to do so, since they are trying to maximize their profits at the same time you are trying to maximize your cost savings.  

Busting the budget is everyone's biggest fear when it comes to renovation. And with good reason. Even if you follow the essential advice we've been doling out for years—build in a 20 percent cushion to cover the nasty surprises, get contractor references and check them, banish the words "while you're at it" from your vocabulary—it's hard not to end up shelling out more than you want to, even if you want to pen a check for a million bucks.
Redoing an old house on a budget requires proper planning and creativity. Planning here means you need to know what is feasible and what is your budget. Creativity refers to do part of the renovation by yourself or consult your contractor friends instead of outsourcing all the work to a single Contractor. And finally, take your time and no need to rush to get all the work done all at once.
×