"Pay attention to the lighting. Well lit space always looks larger, so if the budget allows smart redistribution of lights and placing them on the dimmer or preset mood control will create the desired ambiance. Eliminate pendants that dangle at the head/eye level, they typically 'drop' the ceiling and make the room look even smaller. Wall mount fixtures are usually the best decorative application for a small bathroom, just make sure no one will bump into them." - Idée Chic Designs
A full grand surround turns a conventional shower into a steam shower. A transom installed above the door could be utilized in a way where it would dry the shower every time you close the door. Likewise, placing the fan near the transom can also help in drawing air out of the shower every time you close the door. For those with a steam shower, it’s highly recommended to incorporate a bigger bathroom fan. Don’t forget to check the grout lines as well. Fewer grout joints are recommended because there’s less surface area to absorb moisture.
Knocking down may not be as costly as rebuilding, but you can still shave dollars by doing some of the demolition yourself—as long as you proceed with care. "If a homeowner wants to demo a deck, well, I am sure they can handle that," says Michael Winn, owner of Winn Design, in Virginia. "But when it comes to interior spaces, I would dissuade them from doing it unless they have done it before." The reason: A reckless wrecker might unwittingly take out a load-bearing wall or, worse still, plunge a reciprocating saw into live wiring or pressurized plumbing. (For tips on how to do demo right, see our October 2005 feature, "Before You Construct, You Have to Destruct.")
Don't cheap out on paint and brushes. Cheap brushes are false economy. Buy a Wooster or something with some heft. That $3 plastic brush is going make it look like you smeared paint on the wall with a rake. And the bristles fall out. I like a nice 2-1/2-inch angled brush. It's versatile and you can wash and reuse it until the bristles wear down to a nub. And get the most expensive paint, too. Why? Because it will go on easy and offer the best coverage. It'll last a long time. You'll be able to wash a grubby fingerprint off the wall without taking the paint with it. And your whole job will just go quicker and easier.
Grant K. Gibson has been designing homes for more than 15 years. Originally from Los Angeles, the 39-year-old designer, who’s now based in San Francisco, takes pride in creating living spaces that speak to the personality, preferences and experiences of his clients. Now, he’s releasing his first book, The Curated Home, which takes readers inside his design process and educates them on how to develop a timeless and curated interior that’ll fulfill their aesthetic tastes for years to come. “It’s not only about practical tips — how to display objects from travels, what to look for when making furniture purchases and the type of paints that work best in a particular room — but also how to think like an interior designer,” Gibson writes in the book’s introduction.
The problem with painting along the edge of textured ceilings is that it's almost impossible to get a straight line along the top of the wall without getting paint on the ceiling bumps. Pros have a simple solution. They run a screwdriver along the perimeter of the ceiling to scrape off the texture. "This lets you cut in without getting paint on the ceiling texture," one of our pros says. "The screwdriver creates a tiny ridge in the ceiling, so the tips of your paint bristles naturally go into it. And you'll never even notice the missing texture."
Remodelers can do some amazing things, but they can't read minds. "Let the company supervisor or project lead person know if anything is unsatisfactory so they can deal with the issue," says Jeff Hurst, a Certified Remodeler (CR) and president of Hurst Total Home, Inc., in Kettering, Ohio. "The contractor may not be aware that something is not OK with the owner."
Try to use all the space of your bathroom as much as possible, if your bathroom is on the smaller side, then you have to unleash your creativity in order to design the space and make it look larger. Glass doors for tubs and showers are perfect if your purpose is to open up the room, and the pedestal sinks are ideal since they occupy lesser space when compared to cabinets.  All cabinets and tower cabinets above the toilets, as well as towel racks are perfect for those who need storage, but who don’t have much space to work with.
Some types of wood have grain with many open pores. Oak is a good example. The pores show through finishes and are especially noticeable under paint. It’s OK to leave the grain showing, but if you want a smooth, grain-free look, you’ll have to fill the pores before painting. There are a few methods. You can apply several coats of a high-build primer, sanding between coats until the pores are filled. Or you can fill the grain with spackling as shown here. If your cabinets have a lot of curves and molded edges, filling with spackling is more difficult. When the filler dries, sand and prime as usual to finish the job.
"Another great space saver is a fully mirrored recessed medicine cabinet. Once installed the cabinet looks like a stylish flat or beveled mirror but has hidden storage of 4 inches which is the depth of a standard wall. These cabinets come in a variety of heights and widths to accommodate most applications and the best part about the cabinet is it's fully mirrored inside so you can easily see what product is behind the bottle of mouthwash!" - Banner Plumbing Supply
The cost to demo a kitchen can vary depending on how much of the space you’re demolishing. A full kitchen demolition, including plumbing moving costs, can cost anywhere from $1,205 to $2,160. But if you are only demolishing part of your kitchen, or keeping your plumbing as-is, your costs may be much lower. The following table provides a breakdown of how much a partial kitchen demolition might cost:  
By sticking to the lightest shades within a single color family for paint and furniture, you’ll avoid the strong contrasting hues that can make a small room seem even smaller. Matching your choice of floor tile to the wall color can also be a good idea—this will make the corners of the room disappear, creating a feeling of more space. Avoid putting any color on the ceiling, though; a basic white is the best choice here.
I like that you talked about how you can consider choosing glass doors for tubs and showers to make your bathroom space appear bigger and to open up the room. My husband and I are looking to remodel our bathroom. Since we have a small bathroom, it will make sense for us to think of the ways that can effectively make it look bigger and open which can be possible by choosing glass materials. With that being said, I will make sure to consider all your tips for bathroom remodeling. Thanks!
When you're ready to call it a day, you can soak your roller in paint and then wrap it in a plastic bag so it's airtight. If you're returning to the job the next day, that'll work fine. If it's going to be a while, you can still put the bag over the roller, but then use it to pull the roller off without covering yourself in paint. Then use a new roller the next time (see: Don't be cheap). As for your expensive brush, you can wash that out—presuming you're using latex paint, which is water-based. Drag a hose to an out-of-the way spot and wash the brush while alternately rapping it against the bottom of your shoe to shake out the bristles. Do that until it's clean and it'll be ready to go the next time you steel your courage to tackle another room.
Nothing is more discouraging when you've finished painting than to peel tape off the woodwork and discover the paint bled through. To avoid the pain-in-the-neck chore of scraping off the paint, do a thorough job of adhering the tape before you start. "Apply tape over the wood, then run a putty knife over the top to press down the tape for a good seal," a painter with more than 16 years of experience says. "That'll stop any paint bleeds."
"Storage must-haves: towels, toilet paper, daily supplies (teeth supplies, cleansers, makeup, etc.). Wasted space: Pedestal sinks (beautiful, but not functional if you have limited space). Consider: Behind the door hooks for towels and robes or over the door pouches for holding small supplies (hair, makeup) and medicine cabinets and/or shelving set inside the walls, in between the studs." - Storage and organizing expert Helene Segura, M.A. Ed., CPO
Take note of design inspirations in every facet of life. I often use these as a starting point to discuss with clients when I’m hired to help them design the interiors of their homes. Recall a hotel in which you’ve stayed or restaurant in which you’ve dined that particularly struck your fancy. Perhaps it was a minimal interior from your trip to Japan or a clubby bar in New York furnished with worn leather chairs.
You should sand cabinets before beginning your how to paint kitchen cabinet project to give the new paint a good surface to grip. But you don’t need to sand to bare wood. If your cabinets have a factory finish, sand lightly with 120-grit sandpaper or a sanding sponge. If the surface is rough from a previous paint job or poor varnishing job, start with coarser 100-grit paper to remove bumps. Then sand again with 120-grit to get rid of any sanding marks.
You will be surprised at the number of options you have once you start your research. The beautiful lamp that you liked at a high end store can be purchased at a lower price from elsewhere as well. So, when renovating your house on budget please remember that if you research to find the furniture you like, paint you want or the decorations you would like in your house, you are likely to find most of the supplies at an inexpensive price. Take advantage of online shopping, thrift stores and second hand furniture shops and see how far you will go. For step by step instructions on how you can decorate your house beautifully yet economically please read below:

“There are so many great options for kitchen flooring that are budget friendly. Brady from our team recently redid his entire kitchen floor for under $50 using easy to use peel and stick tile that comes in a handful of colors. If you are looking for something more permanent, then a simple 12x12 ceramic tile with a small grout line is a great option for you as well.”

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