According to the experts, 2020 will be a Star year for some very specific paint colors. Whether you’re the type of person to jump on the wagon of new trends, or you want to take some time to sit back and analyze how these new colors will work best for your aesthetic plans, be sure to take a look at this informative list for ideas that will set those plans into motion.
If your walls are in such rough shape that it would take a painting contractor days of filling and sanding to make them ready for the roller, consider using materials such as Texturglas, from Deerfield Beach, Florida— based company Roos International. A breathable, nontoxic wall covering made of fine glass filaments, Texturglas has a similar look and feel to the fiberglass matting used in auto-body work. It's available in a variety of surface patterns, takes paint readily, and is designed to be installed right on top of existing surfaces, adding strength while covering up dings.

It’s important to look beyond the space of the bathroom. Think about the entire look of your house. What kind of layout would best match the design? Does your preferred bathroom layout blend well with the rest of your home? Keep in mind that not everything has to be matched perfectly for it to blend well with your home. Not every door handle has to be bronze, for example. But if you choose a contrasting design, such as silver with bronze, it can be too distracting. If your bathroom is a part of your master bedroom, it is critical to blend the design. Don’t choose a stark bright color to distract from the theme of the main room. Instead, make it an extension of the room that flows well without taking away from the grandeur of the bedroom. A common adage is “add, not change.”There is also a matter of “functional zoning.” This is a good way for you to plan your bathroom layout around the idea of what’s functional. Instead of remodeling from a design perspective, instead think of things from a use perspective. Planning an effective space has everything to do with your lifestyle and how you best use the space. Make sure you incorporate this in your bathroom remodeling.
At Sebring Design Build, we have a lot to look forward to for 2020. From celebrating the new year in style, to adding a splash of color to a shady office or bedroom, there’s a lot to be done as soon as possible. For more ideas about paint trends and other home remodeling tips, you can check out our Free Ebook: Remodeling 101. In it, you’ll find a wealth of information to help you determine what the next steps are in your remodeling planning process.
Use what the pros use—canvas drop cloths. They're not slippery and they absorb splatters (but still wipe up large spills or they can bleed through). "Unless you're painting a ceiling, you don't need a jumbo-size cloth that fills the entire room," a pro says. "A canvas cloth that's just a few feet wide and runs the length of the wall is ideal for protecting your floor, and it's easy to move."
If you are decorating/renovating your house then you are probably trying to de-clutter and maximize your storage as well. Utilizing your kitchen to its maximum capacity can help you minimize your storage problems. In order to do this on a low budget you can either DIY kitchen cabinets or storages from recycled material at your house, or take advantage of thrift shops in your area.
Corridor- or galley-style kitchens often have such limited space that footprint changes are not possible, short of major alterations to the home's structure. One-wall layouts allow for a little more flexibility since they do have an open side. In this case, adding a kitchen island is a great way to add more prep space and storage without major layout changes.
After I purchased my first house, I had only 20,000 USD in my pocket. I recalled my house was in a messy state. The paint was falling off the wall, water closet was leaking and there was mold near to the bathroom where the previous older hanged her clothes. The garden was unkept i.e weeds were everywhere. Therefore, remodeling an old house on a budget requires stringent planning and preparation.
Some people have a natural eye for design, but if you're more in the camp of those who can't do anything without consulting Pinterest board upon Pinterest board before making any major changes, we feel you. We'd love to have an interior designer on speed dial before deciding exactly where and how hang to hang that sweet new wall art we bought on a whim. But until we win the lottery, we'll have to settle for trusting our guts, and taking plenty of design tips where we can get them. We've compiled some secrets straight from the pros to help you with all your decorating needs.
Look at your countertops next. “Limited counter space is always problematic in tiny bathrooms,” Maykut says. Often, you're left with nowhere to set a cup of tea or lay down your curling iron. One creative solution for gaining space is choosing a custom countertop. While most bathroom configurations place the vanity next to the commode, Maykut suggests “extending a narrow ledge of countertop along the wall behind the toilet.” This otherwise wasted space is just right for a supply of tissues or an assortment of toiletries.
The cost to demo a kitchen can vary depending on how much of the space you’re demolishing. A full kitchen demolition, including plumbing moving costs, can cost anywhere from $1,205 to $2,160. But if you are only demolishing part of your kitchen, or keeping your plumbing as-is, your costs may be much lower. The following table provides a breakdown of how much a partial kitchen demolition might cost:  
Busting the budget is everyone's biggest fear when it comes to renovation. And with good reason. Even if you follow the essential advice we've been doling out for years—build in a 20 percent cushion to cover the nasty surprises, get contractor references and check them, banish the words "while you're at it" from your vocabulary—it's hard not to end up shelling out more than you want to, even if you want to pen a check for a million bucks.
Almost anything can serve as an accessory, and that goes for found objects and household items that cost practically nothing. Architectural corbels rescued from a salvage yard make great bookends, while seashells and driftwood collected at the shore create a lovely natural grouping. A bowl filled with crisp green apples lends a bright pop of color to just about any surface, and a stack of vintage hardbacks adds height, dimension and character to an occasional table.
Pro Tip: Use an enamel underbody primer. Water-based paint has come a long way, and some top-quality acrylic alkyd hybrids rival oil-based paint. Still, many pro painters prefer oil-based paint, especially for priming. Oil-based paint dries slowly and levels well. This gives you more working time and fewer brush marks. Also, when they’re dry, oil-based primers like Benjamin Moore Fresh Start Enamel Underbody sand easily to provide a perfect base for your finish coat.
Even the best paint for kitchen cabinets won’t stick to greasy cabinets. So the first critical step in preparing how to paint kitchen cabinets is to clean them with a grease-cutting solution. Dishwashing liquid will work, but a dedicated grease remover like TSP substitute is even better. Mix according to the instructions and scrub the cabinets. Then rinse them with clear water and wipe them dry with a clean rag.
You may not have a wad of cash or a lot of home-improvement know-how, but you have other resources that can help get your decorating project off the ground: the people you know. Call on a group of relatives, friends and neighbors who can supply the muscle to rip down wall paneling, roll on paint or assemble a room of flat-packed furniture. Just don’t forget to feed them lunch.
We were fortunate enough to have a couple of friends advise us on certain parts of the project. This made things much easier and saved us a couple of costly mistakes. For example a carpenter friend advised me to get some fans and dry the subfloor out rather than cut it out and replace it. Worked just fine and saved me a thousand bucks in plywood and a couple of days work.
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