At Sebring Design Build, we have a lot to look forward to for 2020. From celebrating the new year in style, to adding a splash of color to a shady office or bedroom, there’s a lot to be done as soon as possible. For more ideas about paint trends and other home remodeling tips, you can check out our Free Ebook: Remodeling 101. In it, you’ll find a wealth of information to help you determine what the next steps are in your remodeling planning process.
Nothing is more discouraging when you've finished painting than to peel tape off the woodwork and discover the paint bled through. To avoid the pain-in-the-neck chore of scraping off the paint, do a thorough job of adhering the tape before you start. "Apply tape over the wood, then run a putty knife over the top to press down the tape for a good seal," a painter with more than 16 years of experience says. "That'll stop any paint bleeds."
Use what the pros use—canvas drop cloths. They're not slippery and they absorb splatters (but still wipe up large spills or they can bleed through). "Unless you're painting a ceiling, you don't need a jumbo-size cloth that fills the entire room," a pro says. "A canvas cloth that's just a few feet wide and runs the length of the wall is ideal for protecting your floor, and it's easy to move."
The secret to a finish that's free of lap and brush marks is mixing a paint extender (also called a paint conditioner), such as Floetrol, into the paint. This does two things. First, it slows down the paint drying time, giving you a longer window to overlap just-painted areas without getting ugly lap marks that happen when you paint over dried paint and darken the color. Second, paint extender levels out the paint so brushstrokes are virtually eliminated (or at least much less obvious). Pros use extenders when painting drywall, woodwork, cabinets, and doors. Manufacturer's directions tell you how much extender to add per gallon of paint.
Keeping the walls and trim light doesn’t mean you have to settle for an absence of all color or personality, though. Maykut recommends injecting color into the bathroom through the accessories you choose. Bold red towels and a soap dispenser in a matching shade will energize a small bathroom without overwhelming it. Add texture and color to the floor with a patterned rug. Should you tire of the look of your bathroom down the road, this color strategy makes updating easy: All you have to do is switch out your textiles and accessories to create a whole new look and feel.
When you're ready to call it a day, you can soak your roller in paint and then wrap it in a plastic bag so it's airtight. If you're returning to the job the next day, that'll work fine. If it's going to be a while, you can still put the bag over the roller, but then use it to pull the roller off without covering yourself in paint. Then use a new roller the next time (see: Don't be cheap). As for your expensive brush, you can wash that out—presuming you're using latex paint, which is water-based. Drag a hose to an out-of-the way spot and wash the brush while alternately rapping it against the bottom of your shoe to shake out the bristles. Do that until it's clean and it'll be ready to go the next time you steel your courage to tackle another room.
In painter lingo, a bad set is when you're in a physically bad position for whatever you're trying to do—maybe your ladder isn't quite long enough, or you're in a awkward spot with your brush. The good news is that many bad sets are avoidable. Just climb down and move the ladder. Yeah, it's annoying. But not as annoying as falling into your paint bucket because you were hanging off your ladder like an America's Cup crew member on the port sponson. And sometimes bad sets can be resolved by moving an obstacle. Fridge giving you a tough angle at a wall? Move the fridge.

Paint won't bond to greasy or filthy surfaces, like kitchen walls above a stove, mudrooms where kids kick off their muddy boots and scuff the walls, or the areas around light switches that get swatted at with dirty hands. "I always use a degreaser to clean grimy or greasy surfaces," a pro tells PM. "It cuts through almost anything you have on walls for better paint adhesion."


Rich blues, ripe olives, bright greens that have a sense of calming simplicity. These colors are considered neutrals by nature. These colors bring the sense of nature with it’s natural hues of blues and greens inside your space. This is a trend that will be here to stay for a long time. People are adding life back into their spaces and beautiful natural colors. If you are thinking about grey walls I would think again.
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